Carthage and Ancient Rome in North Africa

Rome established its first African colony, Africa Vetus, in the most fertile part of what was formerly Carthaginian territory, and established Utica as the administrative capital. The remaining territory was left in the domain of the Numidian client King Massinissa. At this time, the Roman policy in Africa was simply to prevent another great power to rise on the far side of Sicily. Therefore, great freedom of rule was granted to Massinissa and his descendents. Upon his death in 148 BCE, the territory was divided among his heirs into several smaller client Kingdoms.

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Excerpts of UNRV History recent edition are reproduced here below as an introduction to the proposed pictures of this article on the vestiges of the Carthage and Ancient Rome in North Africa.  A video on the engineering of Carthage accompanies the above for a better contextualization. 

Provinces of Roman Africa

The idea of Roman expansion into North Africa started with the fear and jealousy caused by the great economic power of Carthage.  In the 3rd Century BC, Rome and Carthage jockeyed with each other for position and strength along the Mediterranean.

The two had developed an unhealthy rivalry which, in 264 BCE led directly to a series of 3 wars, the Punic Wars.  By 146 BCE, Carthage was destroyed and Rome, having taken control of Spain and Africa, was soon to be the undisputed master of the world.

Africa, Numidia and Mauretania

Rome established its first African colony, Africa Vetus, in the most fertile part of what was formerly Carthaginian territory, and established Utica as the administrative capital.  The remaining territory was left in the domain of the Numidian client King Massinissa.  At this time, the Roman policy in Africa was simply to prevent another great power to rise on the far side of Sicily.  Therefore, great freedom of rule was granted to Massinissa and his descendents.  Upon his death in 148 BCE, the territory was divided among his heirs into several smaller client Kingdoms.

Romans, Barbarians, and the Transformation of the Roman World by Ralph W. Mathisen, Ref. : http://www.unrv.com/book-review/romans-barbarians-transformation-roman-world.phpe

Book Review by Ian Hughes

“The past is a foreign country: they do things differently there”.* Nowhere does this oft-quoted opening line apply more than to Late Antiquity. For many years modern historians attempted to view the events surrounding the ‘Fall of Rome’ within the context of their own times, and in the twentieth century drew comparisons with the collapse of the European empires that had dominated the world. Yet the complex nature of the Fall and the bias of the historians resulted in many erroneous conclusions being drawn.

 

Carthage
Carthage
Carthage theatre
Carthage theater
Timgad
Tim-gad
Tim-gad main avenue
Tim-gad main avenue
Tim-gad city
Tim-gad city
Jemila
Jemila
Arc de Jemila
Arc de Jemila
Leptis Magna avenue
Leptis Magna avenue
Medallion at Leptis Magna
Medallion at Leptis Magna
Sabratha
Sabratha
Sabratha theater
Sabratha theater
Tipaza
Tipaza
Tombeau de la Chretienne
Tombeau de la Chretienne
Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria cityscape
Alexandria theater
Theveste
Theveste
Volubilis
Volubilis

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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