Realigning EU Policy in Palestine

The EU’s policy towards Palestinian economic development has long been subordinate to the political process between Israel and the Palestinians, which is not functioning. This paper calls for the EU to rethink its policy to find ways to decouple Palestinian economic development from the political process, to the greatest degree possible.

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Realigning EU Policy in Palestine Towards a Viable State Economy and Restored Dignity.

The MENA region straddling western Asia and northern Africa between the European, the Asian and African continents has been the seat of many civilisations with in its middle, the birth place of all monotheist religions. 

Its people’s whether from sedentary as well nomadic settlements have evolved throughout history; with its diverse populations roaming the lands and the seas alike with always one ethnic or another dominating the rest for a certain period of time before succumbing itself to the next newer power in lieu.

Outsiders like Europeans and Americans of today weighed more or less heavily for obvious reasons of cultural influence, domination and / or simply for reasons of resource chasing. 

It remains that the earliest civilised settlements of the world seem to be having trouble settling down their differences once for all and for the good of each and all. 

Europe, gripped apparently by some sort of remorse over its early XXth century involvement and ensuing actions in the region, is covered by the proposed article of Chatham House in perhaps an attempt to rectify its policies. 

A Research Paper article of Chatham House ‘Middle East and North Africa Programme’ titled “Realigning EU Policy in Palestine Towards a Viable State Economy and Restored Dignity” by Sami Abdel-Shafi and dated 28 October 2015

Here is below a reproduction of the proposed Summary of Chatham House.

While EU policy towards Palestinian economic development has long been subordinate to a stalled and dysfunctional peace process, this paper argues that the EU should rethink its policy and decouple economic development from the political process.

A Palestinian boy carries strawberries in a strawberry field in Beit Lahia, Gaza, December 2014. Photo: Getty Images.
A Palestinian boy carries strawberries in a strawberry field in Beit Lahia, Gaza, December 2014.    Photo: Getty Images.

Summary

  • The EU’s policy towards Palestinian economic development has long been subordinate to the political process between Israel and the Palestinians, which is not functioning. This paper calls for the EU to rethink its policy to find ways to decouple Palestinian economic development from the political process, to the greatest degree possible. If Palestinians achieve a sovereign state, they will need a viable economy to support it. Conversely, if this fundamental political goal is delayed for the longer term, Palestinians are still entitled to dignified lives until they realize it.
  • As an official European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) country, Palestine has received more than €6 billion in EU aid since 1994. But neither has Europe’s vision of helping Palestinian economic development been realized, nor have its interests been met in ensuring the security of Israel or advancing stability in the region. After more than 20 years of an ailing peace process between Israel and the Palestinians, the majority of EU funding has been dedicated to supporting the Palestinian Authority (PA) through an unsustainable economic situation and to supporting the humanitarian needs of Palestinians instead of their development. The ‘myth’ of a Palestinian economy has come to prevail.

– See more at: https://www.chathamhouse.org/publication/realigning-eu-policy-palestine-towards-viable-state-economy-and-restored-dignity?dm_i=1TY8,3RYTR,JV42B5,DLR1D,1#sthash.9XtJ779a.dpuf

 

 

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